Event Title

Agents of Change Panel

Location

Locatelli Center

Event Website

http://law.scu.edu/event/journal-of-international-law-symposium-advancing-global-justice-for-women/#Schedule

Start Date

19-2-2016 3:15 PM

End Date

19-2-2016 4:30 PM

Description

Terry Ann Rogers currently consults for the International Foundation for Electoral Systems (IFES) on women’s political participation, most recently in Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Cambodia, Afghanistan, India, Yemen, Morocco, Lebanon, and the Republic of Georgia. Her last international posting was as the director of the IFES Women’s Legal Rights Initiative in India, where she pioneered the development of a women’s lobbying organization and a Muslim women’s rights project. Prior to her employment at IFES, Rogers was the Country Director for Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Croatia for the American Bar Association (ABA/CEELI) where she managed programs in judicial reform, bar association development, gender equity, legal aid, law school reform, public advocacy and human rights law reform. She was also the Chief of Party for AMIDEAST in Palestine, working on development of the Palestinian Bar Association from 1999­2000. She practiced law for seventeen years in Oregon at Multnomah County Legal Aid Service and started her legal career in private practice in California in 1974. She is a graduate of New York University School of Law.

Dr. Gwynn Thomas is an Associate Professor of Global Gender Studies in the Department of Transnational Studies at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. Her first book, Contesting Legitimacy in Chile: Familial Ideals, Citizenship, and Political Struggle, 1970­1990 (Penn State Press 2011), examines the mobilization of familial beliefs in Chilean political conflicts. Her published work examining women’s political activism, women’s presidencies in Latin America and institutional change supporting gender equality has appeared in The Journal of Women, Politics and Policy, The International Feminist Journal of Politics, Journal of Latin American Studies, the ISA Compendium Project, and The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Her research has been supported by grants from the Social Science Research Council, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Tinker Foundation, the Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy, the Institute for Research and Education on Women and Gender, and the Humanities Institute.

Sujin Lee is a South Korean Judge and a visiting scholar at Santa Clara Law School, where her research focuses on toxic pollution to the environment and humans, as well as the prevention of future harm to humans and the environment. Sujin holds an LL.B. from Seoul National University and an Attorney License from the Judicial Research and Training Institute, Korea. She began her career at the Seoul Northern District Court in Seoul, Korea in 2005 and then moved to Seoul Central District Court, Chamber of Environmental Trials, where she dealt with civil environmental cases. She also received the Master of Laws Degree from Stanford Law School specializing in Environmental Law and Policy. Most recently, Sujin was handling civil cases at Incheon District Court in Incheon, Korea, an executive Secretary, Korean Association of Women Judges (KAWJ), where she held seminars and conducted research focusing on woman and minority issues.

Meera E. Deo, J.D., Ph.D., is an interdisciplinary scholar who utilizes empirical methods to interrogate trends in legal education, institutional diversity, and affirmative action. During the 2013-14 academic year Professor Deo was a Visiting Scholar with Berkeley Law’s Center for the Study of Law & Society (Fall) and a Visiting Professor at UCLA School of Law (Spring). Professor Deo’s research has been cited in numerous amicus briefs filed in the U.S. Supreme Court. She has recently published multiple articles from her landmark Diversity in Legal Academia project, which examines how the intersection of race and gender affect tenure and promotion, work/life balance, institutional support, and other aspects of the personal and professional lives of American law faculty members. She currently serves on the Executive Committee for the AALS Section on Law and the Social Sciences and is an appointee to the California Commission on Access to Justice.xtensively in the areas of discrimination, civil rights, employment law, trial practice and federal procedure while practicing law in the United States.

Media Format

flash_audio

 
Feb 19th, 3:15 PM Feb 19th, 4:30 PM

Agents of Change Panel

Locatelli Center

Terry Ann Rogers currently consults for the International Foundation for Electoral Systems (IFES) on women’s political participation, most recently in Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Cambodia, Afghanistan, India, Yemen, Morocco, Lebanon, and the Republic of Georgia. Her last international posting was as the director of the IFES Women’s Legal Rights Initiative in India, where she pioneered the development of a women’s lobbying organization and a Muslim women’s rights project. Prior to her employment at IFES, Rogers was the Country Director for Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Croatia for the American Bar Association (ABA/CEELI) where she managed programs in judicial reform, bar association development, gender equity, legal aid, law school reform, public advocacy and human rights law reform. She was also the Chief of Party for AMIDEAST in Palestine, working on development of the Palestinian Bar Association from 1999­2000. She practiced law for seventeen years in Oregon at Multnomah County Legal Aid Service and started her legal career in private practice in California in 1974. She is a graduate of New York University School of Law.

Dr. Gwynn Thomas is an Associate Professor of Global Gender Studies in the Department of Transnational Studies at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. Her first book, Contesting Legitimacy in Chile: Familial Ideals, Citizenship, and Political Struggle, 1970­1990 (Penn State Press 2011), examines the mobilization of familial beliefs in Chilean political conflicts. Her published work examining women’s political activism, women’s presidencies in Latin America and institutional change supporting gender equality has appeared in The Journal of Women, Politics and Policy, The International Feminist Journal of Politics, Journal of Latin American Studies, the ISA Compendium Project, and The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Her research has been supported by grants from the Social Science Research Council, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Tinker Foundation, the Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy, the Institute for Research and Education on Women and Gender, and the Humanities Institute.

Sujin Lee is a South Korean Judge and a visiting scholar at Santa Clara Law School, where her research focuses on toxic pollution to the environment and humans, as well as the prevention of future harm to humans and the environment. Sujin holds an LL.B. from Seoul National University and an Attorney License from the Judicial Research and Training Institute, Korea. She began her career at the Seoul Northern District Court in Seoul, Korea in 2005 and then moved to Seoul Central District Court, Chamber of Environmental Trials, where she dealt with civil environmental cases. She also received the Master of Laws Degree from Stanford Law School specializing in Environmental Law and Policy. Most recently, Sujin was handling civil cases at Incheon District Court in Incheon, Korea, an executive Secretary, Korean Association of Women Judges (KAWJ), where she held seminars and conducted research focusing on woman and minority issues.

Meera E. Deo, J.D., Ph.D., is an interdisciplinary scholar who utilizes empirical methods to interrogate trends in legal education, institutional diversity, and affirmative action. During the 2013-14 academic year Professor Deo was a Visiting Scholar with Berkeley Law’s Center for the Study of Law & Society (Fall) and a Visiting Professor at UCLA School of Law (Spring). Professor Deo’s research has been cited in numerous amicus briefs filed in the U.S. Supreme Court. She has recently published multiple articles from her landmark Diversity in Legal Academia project, which examines how the intersection of race and gender affect tenure and promotion, work/life balance, institutional support, and other aspects of the personal and professional lives of American law faculty members. She currently serves on the Executive Committee for the AALS Section on Law and the Social Sciences and is an appointee to the California Commission on Access to Justice.xtensively in the areas of discrimination, civil rights, employment law, trial practice and federal procedure while practicing law in the United States.

http://digitalcommons.law.scu.edu/scujil_symposia/women/symposium/1