Event Website

http://law.scu.edu/humanitarian

Start Date

3-2-2012 2:30 PM

End Date

3-2-2012 4:00 PM

Description

Since the United States initiated its military response to the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001, law and respect for legal rights has remained a focal point of legitimacy. No single issue, however, has dominated the legal debate. Instead, like Republican candidates for the presidential nomination, different issues have risen to discourse dominance, only to recede as other issues displaced them. Was the invasion of Afghanistan justified? What was the status of captured Taliban and al Qaeda operatives? What techniques were permissible to interrogate these detainees? Did the detainees have a right to judicial review? Was the invasion of Iraq justified? Was the response to detainee abuses in Iraq sufficient? What was the scope of the armed conflict with al Qaeda, and who was included within the scope of that conflict? What were the limits on the use of remotely piloted drones to attack alleged terrorist operatives? Could that attack authority extend to U.S. citizens?

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Feb 3rd, 2:30 PM Feb 3rd, 4:00 PM

Emerging Issues in International Humanitarian Law: The Right to Counsel

Since the United States initiated its military response to the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001, law and respect for legal rights has remained a focal point of legitimacy. No single issue, however, has dominated the legal debate. Instead, like Republican candidates for the presidential nomination, different issues have risen to discourse dominance, only to recede as other issues displaced them. Was the invasion of Afghanistan justified? What was the status of captured Taliban and al Qaeda operatives? What techniques were permissible to interrogate these detainees? Did the detainees have a right to judicial review? Was the invasion of Iraq justified? Was the response to detainee abuses in Iraq sufficient? What was the scope of the armed conflict with al Qaeda, and who was included within the scope of that conflict? What were the limits on the use of remotely piloted drones to attack alleged terrorist operatives? Could that attack authority extend to U.S. citizens?

http://digitalcommons.law.scu.edu/humanitarian/symposium/track/4